Boiling Water Attack Update: A Conviction

Homophobic jackass  Martin Blackwell has been sentenced to 40 years for pouring hot water on his girlfriend’s son and his boyfriend as they lay in bed.

All I have to say is: GOOD.  Dude pretty much confessed as he was being arrested, and was facing 80 years.  I’m a little shocked that this happened in Georgia, where they don’t even have hate-crime laws, but I’m saying GOOD all the same.

I hope for further healing for Anthony Gooden and Marquez Tolbert, who still require assistance due to severe burns.

BAD.

The bad guy was caught and justice was served.

GOOD.

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Boiling Water Attack Update: A Conviction
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2 thoughts on “Boiling Water Attack Update: A Conviction

  1. 1

    Flying into a rage and attacking them with whatever was at hand would have been horrible enough, but to sneak around, bring a pot of water to boil, slip into the room and dump it onto two inoffensive sleeping people shows a premeditation, an intent to maim, a hollow, evil soul that should never walk among a defenseless people again. Beyond revenge or punishment, he needs to die in prison because none of us is safe if he’s free.

  2. 2

    The FBI have said they will not pursue federal hate crime charges against Blackwell. Normally I would be livid, but in this case I have no problem with that decision.

    Hate crime laws were created because, in the past, the injustice system of corrupt cops, prosecutors and judges refused to prosecute criminals when they didn’t like the victims (e.g. the KKK’s past crimes in the deep south US). In Blackwell’s case, Georgia did properly prosecute him and give a stiff sentence. At his age, forty years with twenty before parole means he will likely die behind bars.

    But you have to wonder: Would the Georgia courts have reached that verdict and sentence without the FBI breathing down their necks, without federal hate crime legislation in existence? Somehow, I doubt it.

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