The Talented and Adventurous

Mariele Neudecker builds three-dimensional images within aquariums. Her art, a fusion of chemistry and sculpture, is an ongoing series she has titled ‘Tank Works’.

For more of her art, check out her website, as well as This Is Colossal.

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Continue reading “The Talented and Adventurous”

The Talented and Adventurous
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Pop Culture Link Roundup 9.25.14

This following images will be fill today’s quota of the spectacular. 

Although these stunning images might look like the work of Photoshop magic, photographer Robert Bösch (or Robert Boesch) captured these campaign photos for the Swiss mountaineering brand Mammut by carefully coordinating an entire team of mountaineers on the snowy Alps. Racing against time and extreme conditions, the team demonstrated their mountain-climbing skills and the durability of Mammut’s products by hiking to incredible heights, hanging from suspension ropes in precise positions, and forming beautiful patterns and shapes spread over the landscape.

The crowning image is the above shot of the Matternhorn, captured for the brand’s 2015 ad campaigns. Paying homage to explorer Edward Whymper and his team, who were the first to ascend to the peak 150 years ago, Bösch directed his team of mountaineers to journey to their designated locations, shine their lights, and illuminate the route taken by Whymper a century and a half ago. The carefully crafted image not only honors those brave people who climbed the Matterhorn in the past, but also inspires adventurous souls who hope to reach the zenith in the future.

Check out My Modern Metropolis for more cool images.

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The trailer for the upcoming Jupiter Rising film by the Wachowski Brothers Siblings [edit: I apologize for this screw up.  I had forgotten that Lana Wachowski transitioned to a woman several years back.  It was a fuckup on my part and I’m sorry.]

The early trailers for the Wachowskis’ Jupiter Ascending have always looked impressive, but they seemed like they wanted to bludgeon people into theaters by assaulting them with an overabundance of chaotic scifi/CG action. But this third trailer is the first one to makes me want to see the movie.

Of course, we’ve known the plot details of the movie for a while — Mila Kunis is the reincarnation of the queen of the galaxy, the evil Eddie Redmayne wants to keep her from inheriting the space throne and Earth — but the trailer lays it out cleanly and efficiently, from the secret origin of humanity on Earth to why and how Mila somehow doesn’t know she’s space royalty, to why her emergence puts the Earth in danger. But it also has no lack of amazing visuals, including elf-eared Channing Tatum fighting a winged lizard alien.

(via i09)

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The Chalk and Charcoal Characters of David Zinn-On the Streets of Ann Arbor

More images at This Is Colossal.

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Women in Food:  Kuniko Yagi

There have been countless news stories highlighting just how few women—only 6.3%, in fact—hold executive chef roles in the U.S. But taking a bird’s eye view of the local culinary landscape, there appear to be heaps of immensely talented female chefs breaking the mold, paving the way for a new generation of young women aspiring to pursue a career in the kitchen. We’ve sought out to showcase their stories through a video series called “Women in Food.”

The first female chef on deck is Kuniko Yagi of Hinoki & The Bird, the stunning Silk Road fusion restaurant that’s one of the best in Los Angeles. She tells us about her internship in Tokyo, where she was the first woman to wear a chef’s coat in a traditional kaiseki restaurant that had been open for over 50 years. (She was still not allowed to cook, however.) When she returned to L.A. to open Hinoki, Yagi employed almost 70% women in her Century City kitchen. There, she shares her immense knowledge of world cooking with a budding group of talented young chefs, many of whom are women as well.

Pop Culture Link Roundup 9.25.14

Pop Culture Tidbits 9.16.14

Loki’s going to be in King Kong!

Legendary Pictures shocked the Comic-Con crowd with a teaser for the King Kong origin film Skull Island. They’ve set Jordan Vogt-Roberts to helm, and Loki himself, Tom Hiddleston, to star in the Max Borenstein-scripted pic. Previous works have touched on the island, but staying on and exploring this mysterious and dangerous place offers Legendary the opportunity to take audiences deeper inside this rich world, which was the most electrifying parts of Peter Jackson’s King Kong done for Universal several years ago. Universal Pictures will release on November 4, 2016.

Wouldn’t it be cool if they shot the movie in stop motion animation as a tribute to the 1933 movie? Even if you say otherwise, it *would* be cool, bc stop motion animation is vewwy, vewwy cool

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 In a first for DC Comics:

DC Comics Debuts First Ever Female Creators Panel at NYCC

Get an inside look at some of the amazing work from DCE’s female creatives at the “Women Of DC Entertainment” panel which will include JOKER’S DAUGHTER writer Marguerite Bennett, new series GOTHAM ACADEMY writer Becky Cloonan, HARLEY QUINN writer/artist Amanda Conner, WONDER WOMAN writer Meredith Finch, COFFIN HILL writer Caitlin Kittredge, SECRET SIX writer Gail Simone, and new BATGIRL artist Babs Tarr. Saturday 6:15pm Room Room 1A06

Your turn Marvel!

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Portuguese artist  Bordallo II makes use of trash he finds in the streets of Lisbon to make awesome art:

(more images at the link)

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Santa Monica wants to know if it’s happy

This may feel like an Onion article, but trust us—it’s real. The city applied for the Bloomberg Philanthropies Mayors Challenge grant last year, a program that encourages cities to generate ideas to improve city life. Santa Monica was one of five cities in the nation to win the research money. They beat out 300 other cities and snagged a whopping $1 million.

While other winners like Houston, Texas plan on studying recycling and Providence, Rhode Island on predicting academic outcomes of the youth, Santa Monica will be studying the well-being of its city folks.

You might be asking why Santa Monicans aren’t sure whether they’re happy or not. The AP reported that the real estate blog Movoto recently ranked Santa Monica second place in its top 10 list of America’s Most Stressed-Out Suburbs. Insufferable traffic and the high cost of living were the factors that carried Santa Monica into its ranking. According to Movato’s study, locals spend 39 percent of their income on rent and the city has the ninth highest population density. There are 92,000 people who live in Santa Monica.

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Christopher J. Rivera wows with worlds of fantasy captured with photography

 

Pop Culture Tidbits 9.16.14

Entertainment news and offbeat art

Is Matt Damon set to play Jason Bourne again?

Matt Damon IS Jason Bourne

Jason Bourne is coming back. Universal Pictures has begun making deals with Matt Damon and director Paul Greengrassto reunite for their third film in The Bourne Identity series, sources tell me. This is an absolute stunner — and Universal would not comment nor would the reps — because Greengrass told Deadline as recently as last year that once Bourne regained his memory, there was no place else for the character to go creatively. His search formed the spine for the trilogy Damon starred in.

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Avengers: Age of Ultron plot synopsis released!!!!!!!!!!!

When Tony Stark tries to jumpstart a dormant peacekeeping program, things go awry and Earth’s Mightiest Heroes, including Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, The Incredible Hulk, Black Widow and Hawkeye, are put to the ultimate test as the fate of the planet hangs in the balance. As the villainous Ultron emerges, it is up to The Avengers to stop him from enacting his terrible plans, and soon uneasy alliances and unexpected action pave the way for an epic and unique global adventure.

Marvel’s Avengers: Age of Ultron stars Robert Downey Jr., who returns as Iron Man, along with Chris Evans as Captain America, Chris Hemsworth as Thor and Mark Ruffalo as The Hulk. Together with Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow and Jeremy Renner as Hawkeye, and with the additional support of Samuel L. Jackson as Nick Fury and Cobie Smulders as Agent Maria Hill, the team must reassemble to defeat James Spader as Ultron, a terrifying technological villain hell-bent on human extinction. Along the way, they confront two mysterious and powerful newcomers, Wanda Maximoff, played by Elizabeth Olsen, and Pietro Maximoff, played by Aaron Taylor-Johnson, and meet an old friend in a new form when Paul Bettany becomes Vision.

Written and directed by Joss Whedon and produced by Kevin Feige, Marvel’s Avengers: Age of Ultron is based on the ever-popular Marvel comic book series The Avengers, first published in 1963. Get set for an action-packed thrill ride when The Avengers return in Marvel’s Avengers:Age of Ultron on May 1, 2015.

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Kanye West thinks that being a married Christian man exonerates him from being an asshole

In what certain outlets have characterized as a “rant,” Kanye West responded to media publications (like ours) that reported he told a fan in a wheelchair to “stand up” at one of his concerts. His response? “I’m a married, Christian man… pick another target.”

Dude, when you’re an insensitive asshole and you get called out for it, you ought to apologize.

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Wow. This art by Ben Chen is both cool and creepy.

I’ve only included 3 images, but there are many more at the link.

Entertainment news and offbeat art

Here, have some funny comics!

Thanks go out to cicely for pointing me in the direction of Bizarrocomics.  Here’s an image that has ‘me’ written all over it:

Here are two from Hunter Fan Hero Liar:

Here, have some funny comics!

Marvel E-i-c "Male characters not as sexualized as female characters"

Marvel Comics has been seeking to diversify their output in the last few years.  They currently have 8 books headlined by female characters, and several more in the pipeline. Though these women are largely white characters, a few, notably Storm and Ms. Marvel, are not.  It’s clear Marvel is making strides to appeal to female readers (a demographic that makes up around 46.67% of the readership-a fact that I wasn’t aware of).

Marvel has made missteps along the way though.  The most public of those missteps is commissioning artist Milo Manara to draw an alternative cover to the upcoming Spiderwoman #1.

Manara’s alternate cover to Spiderwoman #1

The cover has drawn the ire of many comic book readers and the backlash has been covered by mainstream news sources such as the Telegraph, the Guardian, Elle magazine, Entertainment Weekly, and even a parody by the Onion.  To be clear though, the problem isn’t just with Manara’s art (Milo Manara is a European artist well known for his NSFW erotic art), though there’s an element of that (after all, he chose the specific position to draw Spiderwoman in, a position that is not only sexually objectifying-look at her butt, the readers’ eyes are drawn to it-but anatomically incorrect).  There is also a problem with the art by regular interior artist Greg Land, who is known for tracing and using female porn models for photo referencing.  The problem goes further than that even.

The problem is with the depiction of female characters in comics.

The problem is that women are too often sexualized or sexually objectified (why, one might make the argument that the treatment of women in comics is <gasp>sexist; the preceding was snark for the humor impaired).

Marvel Comics’ Editor-In-Chief, Axel Alonso, recently spoke about this problem, as well as Marvel’s commitment to diversifying its output, especially with regard to appealing to its female readership.

Alonso also explains that, although Marvel has no official policy, the company has been making an unspoken move towards diversity.

“Slowly we have made progress on that front,” he adds. “We believe there’s an audience of women out there who are hungry for this and we want to make sure they get it. This is affirmative action. This is capitalism.”

Someone needs to explain to him what affirmative action is.  A comic book company putting out comics with female characters as the star is a great thing. It needs to happen more.  That’s called progress (or common sense), not affirmative action.

Alonso admits this is an issue: “I don’t think men are as sexualised as women. But the long and short of it is we’re making efforts to change that trend as it exists.” In a recent statement, he explained that the Spiderwoman cover was a result of “mixed messaging” and apologised to anyone who was upset by it.

I get the sense that Alonso has some awareness of the problem, but he still doesn’t fully grasp the outcry against Manara’s art. Especially problematic is that he things that men are sexualized at all in comics.   I’m going to close this post with a comment I made at the above Telegraph article in response to the idea that “men aren’t sexualized as much as women”:

I’ve been reading comics for over 20 years. In that time, I don’t recall mainstream comics sexualizing men *at all*. It’s probably happened once or twice in that time-I don’t claim to have the memory of an elephant, though when it comes to comics, I *do* have a pretty good memory-but overall, female characters are the ones sexualized in comics. Not men. Part of the problem is a lack of understanding of the terms ‘sexualized’ or ‘sexually objectifying’. What happens to male comic book characters is that they’re *IDEALIZED*. They’re drawn with “perfect” bodies, with sculpted forms, with *ideal* male forms (though with some narrow definitions of “ideal”). Comic books, even today, and especially over the 75 or so years they’ve been around, have heavily catered to male readers. Specifically cisgender, heterosexual male readers. Comics as a medium have rendered male characters as male power fantasies, not as sexualized images. The men in comics have not been drawn in such a way as to make readers view them sexually, which is part of what it means to sexualize them. Contrast that with the depiction of female comic book characters (and no, I don’t claim that all female comics characters are rendered this way. In fact, for the vast majority of the history of comics, they were *NOT* rendered in a sexualized manner-you can’t look at Silver Age comics, for instance, and claim female characters were sexualized therein; the problem is a modern issue, and probably more of a 90s-through today issue). The focus on T&A. The use of the artistic “camera angle” to focus the readers’ eyes on a woman’s breasts or butt, often both at the same time (which is anatomically incorrect much of the time). This is where the sexual objectification comes in. When female characters are sexually objectified, the artistic camera angle focuses on specific body parts of women-those sexualized body part-breasts and butts (though legs and bare tummies are objectified as well), to the detriment of the female character. This doesn’t happen to men. You won’t open a page of a comic book and find panels that focus on mens’ crotches or their butts. You won’t see too many pantsless male characters, and art focusing the readers’ eyes on naked male legs. Focusing the readers’ eyes on the shirtless chest of a male character is not sexualization. Comic book artists, aren’t appealing to gay men or women by drawing shirtless male characters (I’m sure they might be in a few cases, but from the creators’ side, the industry is dominated by heterosexual men, and even the most progressive of them likely isn’t drawing in such a way as to appeal to women or gay men; incidentally, I don’t want my comics to do that; I’m a gay man, but I don’t read comics to see sexually objectified men). That’s an idealized male form.
Characters in comics are idealized (the overabundance of which is another problem on its own), but only women face sexualization and objectification. Alonso needs to listen to what female readers are telling him. He, like many people, are viewing this issue through the lens of their experience-their privilege. It’s ok to have privilege, but to overcome this problem, you need to look at this issue not through the lens of your experiences. You need to listen to the complaints and try to view things as women are seeing them. I hope Alonso, and other comic book creators will do this one day. When that happens, the medium of comics, that I dearly love, will be that much better.

Marvel E-i-c "Male characters not as sexualized as female characters"

Marvel E-i-c “Male characters not as sexualized as female characters”

Marvel Comics has been seeking to diversify their output in the last few years.  They currently have 8 books headlined by female characters, and several more in the pipeline. Though these women are largely white characters, a few, notably Storm and Ms. Marvel, are not.  It’s clear Marvel is making strides to appeal to female readers (a demographic that makes up around 46.67% of the readership-a fact that I wasn’t aware of).

Marvel has made missteps along the way though.  The most public of those missteps is commissioning artist Milo Manara to draw an alternative cover to the upcoming Spiderwoman #1.

Manara’s alternate cover to Spiderwoman #1

The cover has drawn the ire of many comic book readers and the backlash has been covered by mainstream news sources such as the Telegraph, the Guardian, Elle magazine, Entertainment Weekly, and even a parody by the Onion.  To be clear though, the problem isn’t just with Manara’s art (Milo Manara is a European artist well known for his NSFW erotic art), though there’s an element of that (after all, he chose the specific position to draw Spiderwoman in, a position that is not only sexually objectifying-look at her butt, the readers’ eyes are drawn to it-but anatomically incorrect).  There is also a problem with the art by regular interior artist Greg Land, who is known for tracing and using female porn models for photo referencing.  The problem goes further than that even.

The problem is with the depiction of female characters in comics.

The problem is that women are too often sexualized or sexually objectified (why, one might make the argument that the treatment of women in comics is <gasp>sexist; the preceding was snark for the humor impaired).

Marvel Comics’ Editor-In-Chief, Axel Alonso, recently spoke about this problem, as well as Marvel’s commitment to diversifying its output, especially with regard to appealing to its female readership.

Alonso also explains that, although Marvel has no official policy, the company has been making an unspoken move towards diversity.

“Slowly we have made progress on that front,” he adds. “We believe there’s an audience of women out there who are hungry for this and we want to make sure they get it. This is affirmative action. This is capitalism.”

Someone needs to explain to him what affirmative action is.  A comic book company putting out comics with female characters as the star is a great thing. It needs to happen more.  That’s called progress (or common sense), not affirmative action.

Alonso admits this is an issue: “I don’t think men are as sexualised as women. But the long and short of it is we’re making efforts to change that trend as it exists.” In a recent statement, he explained that the Spiderwoman cover was a result of “mixed messaging” and apologised to anyone who was upset by it.

I get the sense that Alonso has some awareness of the problem, but he still doesn’t fully grasp the outcry against Manara’s art. Especially problematic is that he things that men are sexualized at all in comics.   I’m going to close this post with a comment I made at the above Telegraph article in response to the idea that “men aren’t sexualized as much as women”:

I’ve been reading comics for over 20 years. In that time, I don’t recall mainstream comics sexualizing men *at all*. It’s probably happened once or twice in that time-I don’t claim to have the memory of an elephant, though when it comes to comics, I *do* have a pretty good memory-but overall, female characters are the ones sexualized in comics. Not men. Part of the problem is a lack of understanding of the terms ‘sexualized’ or ‘sexually objectifying’. What happens to male comic book characters is that they’re *IDEALIZED*. They’re drawn with “perfect” bodies, with sculpted forms, with *ideal* male forms (though with some narrow definitions of “ideal”). Comic books, even today, and especially over the 75 or so years they’ve been around, have heavily catered to male readers. Specifically cisgender, heterosexual male readers. Comics as a medium have rendered male characters as male power fantasies, not as sexualized images. The men in comics have not been drawn in such a way as to make readers view them sexually, which is part of what it means to sexualize them. Contrast that with the depiction of female comic book characters (and no, I don’t claim that all female comics characters are rendered this way. In fact, for the vast majority of the history of comics, they were *NOT* rendered in a sexualized manner-you can’t look at Silver Age comics, for instance, and claim female characters were sexualized therein; the problem is a modern issue, and probably more of a 90s-through today issue). The focus on T&A. The use of the artistic “camera angle” to focus the readers’ eyes on a woman’s breasts or butt, often both at the same time (which is anatomically incorrect much of the time). This is where the sexual objectification comes in. When female characters are sexually objectified, the artistic camera angle focuses on specific body parts of women-those sexualized body part-breasts and butts (though legs and bare tummies are objectified as well), to the detriment of the female character. This doesn’t happen to men. You won’t open a page of a comic book and find panels that focus on mens’ crotches or their butts. You won’t see too many pantsless male characters, and art focusing the readers’ eyes on naked male legs. Focusing the readers’ eyes on the shirtless chest of a male character is not sexualization. Comic book artists, aren’t appealing to gay men or women by drawing shirtless male characters (I’m sure they might be in a few cases, but from the creators’ side, the industry is dominated by heterosexual men, and even the most progressive of them likely isn’t drawing in such a way as to appeal to women or gay men; incidentally, I don’t want my comics to do that; I’m a gay man, but I don’t read comics to see sexually objectified men). That’s an idealized male form.
Characters in comics are idealized (the overabundance of which is another problem on its own), but only women face sexualization and objectification. Alonso needs to listen to what female readers are telling him. He, like many people, are viewing this issue through the lens of their experience-their privilege. It’s ok to have privilege, but to overcome this problem, you need to look at this issue not through the lens of your experiences. You need to listen to the complaints and try to view things as women are seeing them. I hope Alonso, and other comic book creators will do this one day. When that happens, the medium of comics, that I dearly love, will be that much better.

Marvel E-i-c “Male characters not as sexualized as female characters”

CBR's 'The Line It Is Drawn'

There’s an ongoing hilarious column at Comic Book Resources called ‘The Line it is Drawn’ (forevermore to be referred to as TLIID, or at least until I forget that I used that acronym and type out the entire columns name, which will likely happen).   I’ll let writer Brian Cronin explain more:

Welcome to our weekly gallery of amazing art by our great collection of artistic talent, all working from YOUR suggestions!

Go follow Comics Should Be Good on Twitter (if you have Twitter, that is – if you don’t, you can go sign up). Here is our Twitter page…http://twitter.com/csbg. And here are the Comics Should Be Good writers who are on Twitter (the links go to the person’s Twitter account) – myself, Greg Hatcher, Chad Nevett, Kelly Thompson, Bill Reed, Greg Burgas, Sonia Harris,Melissa K. and Ken H.

I update the blog’s Twitter account updates whenever a new post is put up on the blog, so it’s an easy way to keep up with the blog. In addition, I post new content on the blog’s Twitter account.

Now on to the bit!

So every week, I ask a question here. You reply to it on our Twitter page (just write @csbg with your reply) and our blog sketch artists will each pick one of your suggestions and I will post them here every week. So every week you will have a new question and you will see the choices picked from the previous week. Here is an archive of all the previous editions of The Line It Is Drawn!

To qualify, you have to be following us when you reply – so go follow us and then give your answer to the following question/challenge (All suggestions due by 3pm Pacific Friday).

The third edition of TLIID had DC Comics character with Warner Bros properties.  There weren’t a lot of choices, so I only had one favorite.

The Green Lantern Corps meets the Lord of the Rings (by Erich Owen)

 

In part 4 of TLIID , the topic was Saturday morning cartoon characters meet comic book characters.

I loved these:

#1 (by Canaan Grall)

X-Babies meet the Muppet Babies

#2 (by Erich Owen)

Captain America meets Captain Caveman (but where’s his son?)

 

The fifth edition of TLIID (heeeey, I remembered!), the topic was comic book characters in different time periods.

There weren’t a lot of pics to choose from, so I only had one favorite, but boyohboy it was awesome!

Dazzler (by Canaan Grall)

 

Part 7 has writer Peter David suggest topics for artists to draw. My favorite was…

X and the City (by Daniel Irizarri)

Part 8 has only a few photos, so I’ll only post one of them, but it’s awesome:

Professor Xavier & Sigmund Freud (by Erich Owen)

 

Part 14 has one of my favorite images from this column of all time, so I’m not going to spoil what it is before I show the image:

The topic was comic strip characters teaming up or mashed up with comic book characters.  This one was Odie as Krypto (by artist Canaan Grall-who I must say does some DAMN beautiful work).

Here’s another:

Captain Marvel (Shazam) and Talky Tawny the talking Tiger mashed up with Calvin & Hobbes (by George Zapata)

At some point I’ll stop posting, but I’m not sure when because there are a lot of editions, and I’m going through them all, and they’re really nifty, hence my desire to share and is this sentence really long?

TLIID part 17 is comic book characters meet Star Wars characters.

X-Babies meet the Ewoks (by Canaan Grall)

Part 18 is ‘Slice o’ life’ meets comic book characters:

The X-Men watch a 3-D movie (poor Cyclops).  Art by Canaan Grall.

Part 19 is another special one, with suggestions by writer Fred van Lente.   The topic is ‘Cowboys vs Aliens’.  Art by Canaan Grall.

 

That’s it for now.  More to come in the future.

CBR's 'The Line It Is Drawn'

CBR’s ‘The Line It Is Drawn’

There’s an ongoing hilarious column at Comic Book Resources called ‘The Line it is Drawn’ (forevermore to be referred to as TLIID, or at least until I forget that I used that acronym and type out the entire columns name, which will likely happen).   I’ll let writer Brian Cronin explain more:

Welcome to our weekly gallery of amazing art by our great collection of artistic talent, all working from YOUR suggestions!

Go follow Comics Should Be Good on Twitter (if you have Twitter, that is – if you don’t, you can go sign up). Here is our Twitter page…http://twitter.com/csbg. And here are the Comics Should Be Good writers who are on Twitter (the links go to the person’s Twitter account) – myself, Greg Hatcher, Chad Nevett, Kelly Thompson, Bill Reed, Greg Burgas, Sonia Harris,Melissa K. and Ken H.

I update the blog’s Twitter account updates whenever a new post is put up on the blog, so it’s an easy way to keep up with the blog. In addition, I post new content on the blog’s Twitter account.

Now on to the bit!

So every week, I ask a question here. You reply to it on our Twitter page (just write @csbg with your reply) and our blog sketch artists will each pick one of your suggestions and I will post them here every week. So every week you will have a new question and you will see the choices picked from the previous week. Here is an archive of all the previous editions of The Line It Is Drawn!

To qualify, you have to be following us when you reply – so go follow us and then give your answer to the following question/challenge (All suggestions due by 3pm Pacific Friday).

The third edition of TLIID had DC Comics character with Warner Bros properties.  There weren’t a lot of choices, so I only had one favorite.

The Green Lantern Corps meets the Lord of the Rings (by Erich Owen)

 

In part 4 of TLIID , the topic was Saturday morning cartoon characters meet comic book characters.

I loved these:

#1 (by Canaan Grall)

X-Babies meet the Muppet Babies

#2 (by Erich Owen)

Captain America meets Captain Caveman (but where’s his son?)

 

The fifth edition of TLIID (heeeey, I remembered!), the topic was comic book characters in different time periods.

There weren’t a lot of pics to choose from, so I only had one favorite, but boyohboy it was awesome!

Dazzler (by Canaan Grall)

 

Part 7 has writer Peter David suggest topics for artists to draw. My favorite was…

X and the City (by Daniel Irizarri)

Part 8 has only a few photos, so I’ll only post one of them, but it’s awesome:

Professor Xavier & Sigmund Freud (by Erich Owen)

 

Part 14 has one of my favorite images from this column of all time, so I’m not going to spoil what it is before I show the image:

The topic was comic strip characters teaming up or mashed up with comic book characters.  This one was Odie as Krypto (by artist Canaan Grall-who I must say does some DAMN beautiful work).

Here’s another:

Captain Marvel (Shazam) and Talky Tawny the talking Tiger mashed up with Calvin & Hobbes (by George Zapata)

At some point I’ll stop posting, but I’m not sure when because there are a lot of editions, and I’m going through them all, and they’re really nifty, hence my desire to share and is this sentence really long?

TLIID part 17 is comic book characters meet Star Wars characters.

X-Babies meet the Ewoks (by Canaan Grall)

Part 18 is ‘Slice o’ life’ meets comic book characters:

The X-Men watch a 3-D movie (poor Cyclops).  Art by Canaan Grall.

Part 19 is another special one, with suggestions by writer Fred van Lente.   The topic is ‘Cowboys vs Aliens’.  Art by Canaan Grall.

 

That’s it for now.  More to come in the future.

CBR’s ‘The Line It Is Drawn’