If I Have Gay Children: Four Promises From A Christian Pastor/Parent

John Pavlovitz made a promise to his children and shared that promise with the world. His promise has me in tears. In a good way. You see, Mr. Pavlovitz is a religious man. Regular readers of this blog know that I’m an atheist, and I don’t think much of religious beliefs (note: I oppose faith as a way of knowing, and think religious beliefs are a net harm to humanity. That said, I do not treat religious PEOPLE badly just bc I disagree, sometimes vehemently with their views). What was his promise? To love his children if they are gay. Not only that, but he said he’d share that with people. He wouldn’t hide the fact from others. He wouldn’t shame his kids for it. Given technology, we hear far too often of stories where kids are kicked out of the house for being LGBT. Parents disowning their children, literally cutting them off from all support, all love, all compassion…these stories are not hard to find. They’re frustratingly common. That’s why stories like this one are so important. It sends a message to other families. It sends a message to LGBT youth. It sends a message of love, acceptance, tolerance, and compassion. It sends a message that parents should send to their children.
Pardon me for a minute, bc this message is making me cry a lot of good tears. You ought to read what Mr. Pavlovitz has to say.

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If I Have Gay Children: Four Promises From A Christian Pastor/Parent
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2 thoughts on “If I Have Gay Children: Four Promises From A Christian Pastor/Parent

  1. 1

    I plan to link the original for my Christian friends to read.

    I think the footnote: “* Note: The word “gay” in this post, refers to anyone who identifies themselves as LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, or Questioning) . Though I certainly realize and respect the distinctions and differences, it was simply the word that would quickly and easily communicate within the context of the piece. It was the clearest and best way to address non-hetereosexual individuals in the post, by using a common tern that would resonate with the average reader. Hopefully my heart for the LGBTQ community is still clear in the writing.”

    is an especially good, and vital, touch.

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