Activist Burnout: Prevention and Treatment

One of the most important keys to the success of the atheist movement is keeping activists engaged for the long haul. But the most inspired and motivated activists are often the ones most likely to eventually burn out. What are some practical strategies for preventing burnout — and for managing it when it happens? And how can activists support each other in not burning out?

4 p.m. – 5 p.m. CDT, Saturday April 14

To submit a question for the Q&A of this panel, please leave a comment below. Questions that are actually questions will receive priority.

Speakers

Greta Christina has been writing professionally since 1989, and has been writing about atheism since 2005. She is author of several books, including “The Way of the Heathen: Practicing Atheism in Everyday Life,” “Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God,” “Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why, and “Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless.” She blogs at Greta Christina’s Blog, at The Orbit, and is on both Facebook and Twitter.

In 2011, Bridgett Crutchfield founded Minority Atheists of MI, and founded Detroit affiliate of Black Nonbelievers in 2013. In 2016, she spearheaded a GoFundMe campaign which raised $7,000 for Flint, MI residents. Bridgett and collaborators then delivered water and baby wipes to Planned Parenthood of Flint, in addition to donating remaining minutes to Genesee County Flint Water Fund. Bridgett has a heart for newly identified Atheists, those who’ve been hurt within the secular community, and assisting those who are interested in forming alliances with the African American community.

{advertisement}
Activist Burnout: Prevention and Treatment
{advertisement}
The Orbit is (STILL!) a defendant in a SLAPP suit! Help defend freedom of speech, click here to find out more and donate!

3 thoughts on “Activist Burnout: Prevention and Treatment

  1. 3

    Keep thinking that the way to deal with our burnout is by getting more people involved to share the work. How can we put things in place to encourage a greater number of people to step up and take on more leading roles so that people such as yourselves are not overburdened? Any thoughts?

Comments are closed.