Orlando, and Listening to TBLG Ex-Muslims

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In the wake of the terrible violence in Orlando this morning, I understand the intent to not engage in anti-Muslim bigotry and hatred. I share it.

But I’m listening to my TBLG ex-Muslim friends. They’ve been subjected to queerphobic horror from their religion for years — and they’re sick of seeing it minimized. They’re asking people to stop contributing to that minimization.

TBLG ex-Muslims are saying that their former religion is a major contributing factor to the hateful queerphobia against them. Yes, other religions and cultures are hatefully queerphobic as well, and when they’re responsible for anti-queer violence, we should say so. But this time, it seems probable that Islamic queerphobia was part of what inspired this terrible act. My friends are tired of having this reality ignored or erased.

I’m boosting their signal.

We don’t have to pretend religious-inspired venom and violence doesn’t exist. We can speak out about it without being bigoted or hateful.

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Orlando, and Listening to TBLG Ex-Muslims
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8 thoughts on “Orlando, and Listening to TBLG Ex-Muslims

  1. 1

    ‘But I’m listening to my TBLG ex-Muslim friends. They’ve been subjected to queerphobic horror from their religion for years — and they’re sick of seeing it minimized. They’re asking people to stop contributing to that minimization.’

    We can haz links?

  2. 3

    The events in Orlando are due to the world wide cultural view NOT to QUESTION AUTHORITY. That form of culture exists today in the US as well, as elsewhere. Just think of the hate that pours forth if one dares to question religious authority in many communities especially in the midwest os the south. The Orlando tragedy is due to religious thinking as the absolute truth. Absolutists are everywhere and think that way just because that is the way it is. So shut up.

  3. 4

    I’ve been thinking about this and how to have a conversation about Islamic queerphobia. I’m not Muslim, and do not come from a Muslim background. I am from a Christian background, and am trans. Christian queerphobia is a huge problem, but while Christian queerphobia has a bigger impact on my own life, Islamic queerphobia is extremely harmful to the many lgbtq Muslims and ex-Muslims. I also live in a culture that is primed to be hostile to anyone that could remotely be percieved as Mulsim. Many people who are hostile to Islam and also queerphobic will use this as cover to engage in more Islamophobia. So I’m not sure how to proceed.

  4. 5

    The problem I always come across when discussing this is that far too many people see things in a black-and-white manner. The message “Islamic homophobia is bad and harmful, but this doesn’t mean that we should discriminate against Muslims or go to war with predominantly-Muslim states” can be tough to get across. And it seems we have to say the whole thing every time. Otherwise we get:

    A: “Islamic homophobia is bad and harmful.”
    B: “You’re right! We should ban Muslims from entering the country…”
    A: “No no, wait…”

    or:

    A: “We shouldn’t discriminate against Muslims.”
    B: “Islam is horribly sexist and homophobic! How can you ally yourself with them?”
    A: “That’s not what I’m saying…”

    Haa… I don’t really have a good solution here. The shades of grey need to be mentioned, perhaps every time this is brought up, lest we give bigots an opening to twist our words to either black or white.

  5. 6

    “We don’t have to pretend religious-inspired venom and violence doesn’t exist. We can speak out about it without being bigoted or hateful.”

    It’s a shame that we live in times where this disclaimer is necessary.

  6. 8

    “We don’t have to pretend religious-inspired venom and violence doesn’t exist. We can speak out about it without being bigoted or hateful.”

    Religious thinkers are very insecure because there is NO evidence for their god (or gods) in addition they think they have the absolute truth about everything. For those reasons, they develop hatred for anyone who questions the basis for there faith. So I will not return their hate but I will definitely question their authority even if I elicit their hatred. We must not avoid criticizing destructive beliefs just because it evokes hatred from some.

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