(Repost) Adventures in Christianist Earth Science Education: In the Beginning…

For a while, now, I’ve planned a series on the kind of creationists who like to run around calling themselves geologists and invade GSA meetings under false pretenses. People like “Stone Stubborn” Steven Austin, who does real geology only to the extent it gives him a Trojan Horse into professional journals and meetings. These smarmy barstards have a distressing tendency to lie by omission, trying to lure actual geologists into associating with them by pretending they’re legit. Then they tell their fundie flocks they’ve presented their work professionally, therefore their creationist crap is SCIENCE. Only, they fail to mention it wasn’t open and avowed creation science they were presenting to the professionals, but innocuous mainstream stuff.

But, you know, they’re kinda clownish, and I can just hear people poo-poohing their danger to the scientific community. Nobody outside of a handful of fundie freaks takes these Young Earth Creationist douchebags seriously, right? We’re not at risk like biology is, yo. No one’s boarding school boards trying to muck with the geology curriculum, so let the rabbits wear glasses and Steve Austin play totes legit geologist to the church-addicted crowd.

Um. Continue reading “(Repost) Adventures in Christianist Earth Science Education: In the Beginning…”

(Repost) Adventures in Christianist Earth Science Education: In the Beginning…

Geobloggers and Geoblog Lovers: Send Me Your Favorite Links!

I want to try a little something new for Rosetta Stones on the Scientific American blog network: sort of a Best o’ the Geoblogosphere type of thing, but (mostly) chosen by you. This would become a regular feature, either monthly or biweekly depending on how many submissions I get. Here’s how it would work: Continue reading “Geobloggers and Geoblog Lovers: Send Me Your Favorite Links!”

Geobloggers and Geoblog Lovers: Send Me Your Favorite Links!

New at Rosetta Stones: Does the Earthquake Swarm Under Mount St. Helens Mean an Eruption is Imminent?

Of course, if you follow me on Facebook, you already know the answer to that question!

Recent earthquakes beneath Mount St. Helens tell us magma’s on the move. Find out what it means for our favorite volcano in my latest post at Rosetta Stones.

Image shows Mount St. Helens, rays of sunshine striking it from low in the west and a thick white cloud over its summit. I'm standing on a grassy ridge to the right, almost invisible due to shadows and my black trench coat. I look very small in comparison to the enormous mountain many miles away.
C’mon, sweetie! Just a little eruption for your Aunty Dana. Please?! Image courtesy Suzanne B., used with permission.
New at Rosetta Stones: Does the Earthquake Swarm Under Mount St. Helens Mean an Eruption is Imminent?

New at Rosetta Stones: Nifty New Maps!

Want to see what a map of a brand-new and probably temporary island can tell us? Would you like to explore Mercury in all its topographic awesomeness? I’ve got a bit of both for you!

Maps are one of the most powerful tools humans have ever created. With a map, you can find your way around. You can organize information on all sorts of things: political affiliations, biospheres, changes in sea ice, migrations of people and animals. You can make maps that show regions changing over time, revealing history and telling stories. Geologic and topographic maps help us understand not only our world, but other worlds, too. Even the simplest maps can tell us important things about the places we’re studying. They can help us see things we never would have noticed without them. Continue reading “New at Rosetta Stones: Nifty New Maps!”

New at Rosetta Stones: Nifty New Maps!

Mystery Flora: Sweet Spring Stars

Here’s a bit of Frivolous Friday fun with flowers! Aoife came at the exact right time of year. Springtime in Seattle is filled with blooms: it seems like absolutely everything wants to put on a display. Even on a short walk around the neighborhood, you can see thousands of lovely blooms in all shades. These delicate pink stars were falling over a fence, and so we of course had to stop to get a closer look.

Image shows a sheet of green leaves and clusters of small pink flowers spilling over a gray wooden fence.
Mystery Flora I

I really love plants like this that drape over things. And these are really fabulous on closer inspection, because the flowers are stars! Continue reading “Mystery Flora: Sweet Spring Stars”

Mystery Flora: Sweet Spring Stars

Random Bits of Hilarity: The Further Adventures of Aoife and Dana

I’m so grateful to Aoife for deciding to come visit my fair city! See, I never get out to see it. I live a short bus ride away from downtown, but I just don’t bother to go unless someone gives me a reason. Which is sad, because I adore downtown Seattle.

And when I go, there’s always something new and fun. Even the construction cranes have a quirky sense of humor. Continue reading “Random Bits of Hilarity: The Further Adventures of Aoife and Dana”

Random Bits of Hilarity: The Further Adventures of Aoife and Dana

New at Rosetta Stones: We’re Roadtripping Through An Ancient Arizona Lake!

The first half of our trip to Montezuma Well is up at Rosetta Stones, in which we have a look at the tectonics of the Verde Valley and get our eyeballs on some hella sweet lake-deposited limestone. Enjoy, my darlings!

New at Rosetta Stones: We’re Roadtripping Through An Ancient Arizona Lake!

Marvelous Metazoans: Watching the Realm

For our Frivolous Friday* fun, let’s have a sneak peek at one of the most remarkable spots in Arizona, and try to identify this adorable critter who seems to be the master of it.

Image shows a small reddish-brown ground squirrel or chipmunk lying on the edge of a limestone cliff, overlooking the rim of Montezuma Well. Its head is turned toward the left. Beyond it is a rugged limestone cliff, and below can be seen portions of the trail that leads down into the Well.
Captain of Montezuma Well. Just chillin’ over my domain.

Alas, I didn’t have my wonderful Sony Cyber-Shot camera back then. Otherwise, you’d get a much clearer view of the critter, and be able to zoom in to drool all over the utterly luscious limestone. But at least it gets the gist of the scene right, and hopefully there’s enough detail to make out what species our darling rodent is. Continue reading “Marvelous Metazoans: Watching the Realm”

Marvelous Metazoans: Watching the Realm

Adventures in Christianist Earth Science Education XXVb: A Thermonuclear Load of Creationist Nonsense

In our last edition, we saw Christianists trying desperately to sneak God into matter and energy. Today, the creationist nonsense gets positively explosive. Hold tight, kiddos.

The SPC folks explain that nuclear fission can be used to blow things up as well as power stuff. They’re quite blasé about the effects of an atomic bomb explosion. They’re all about describing the heat and light of the chain reaction; not so much about telling us what it does to living things like, oh, y’know, innocent human beings. They’re also quick to handwave away the problem of nuclear waste. But considering how enamored the American Right is of fossil fuels, this amuses me greatly: Continue reading “Adventures in Christianist Earth Science Education XXVb: A Thermonuclear Load of Creationist Nonsense”

Adventures in Christianist Earth Science Education XXVb: A Thermonuclear Load of Creationist Nonsense